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COVID-19 Means Nobody is Sleeping Soundly, Including Pasadena Engineers Who Work From Home

GuRu Wireless Inc., a small Pasadena startup that’s working to develop millimeter-wave wireless power technology for commercial use, is showing how engineers could continue to be productive by using innovative work-from home strategies in the midst of a pandemic. Florian Bohn, GuRu Inc. CEO, said Work From Home for engineers will not be limited to video-conferencing alone, because work will not only involve graphs or text that can be shared online, but circuits and parts to design and to test […]

GuRu Wireless Inc., a small Pasadena startup that’s working to develop millimeter-wave wireless power technology for commercial use, is showing how engineers could continue to be productive by using innovative work-from home strategies in the midst of a pandemic.

Florian Bohn, GuRu Inc. CEO, said Work From Home for engineers will not be limited to video-conferencing alone, because work will not only involve graphs or text that can be shared online, but circuits and parts to design and to test as well.

Featured on the electronics industry website FierceElectronics, Bohn said Work From Home for their engineers has been a little more involved.

“Now when people test, they set up a test at a home session and take some of the equipment home or have things shipped there,” Bohn told FierceElectronics. “There’s overhead to hauling or shipping things home and you have to be very clever and efficient about who does what in a team and in what way.”

The publication said GuRu engineers are using various well-established electronic design automation (EDA) tools to design integrated circuits and printed circuit boards and to conduct simulations for thermal, mechanical and electromagnetic effects.

“We do drop test simulations, antenna simulations, thermal simulations – you name it and they can do it all,” Bohn said.

The simulations, Bohn said, are run on the mainframe in GuRu’s main office such that their Work From Home engineers’ home computers are basically a terminal running on remote.

“The software that is running is running remotely and all you have on the screen is display data that’s fairly low bandwidth and far less than streaming video,” Bohn explained.

One thing GuRu Inc. tries to do for their Work From Home engineers is help them get the best possible internet connection with a VPN (virtual private network), which is ideal for online electronics development work.

“Every employee needs the best connection so that it’s almost transparent that you are connected remotely,” Bohn said in the FierceElectronics interview.

For fabrication and testing at home, Bohn recommends allocating a good amount of desk space for such tasks, even at the patio or the garage.

Last year, GuRu Wireless, which evolved from Auspion Inc., introduced itself as the first company to offer room-scale, multi-watt, multi-device, safe wireless power-at-a-distance using millimeter-wave (mmWave) technology. In November 2019, the company said it had received $15 million in Series A funding from Kairos Ventures and BOLD Capital Partners, and will use the funds to complete commercialization, obtain FCC approval of its first products and add new management and engineering talent.

GuRu’s technology is rooted in the lab of Caltech Professor Ali Hajimiri, who with Bohn and Behrooz Abiri founded GuRu to continue developing systems that could send energy over distance, including collecting solar power in space and transmitting the energy wirelessly to Earth.

Since its founding in 2017, the company has transformed its core technology into commercially viable solutions while operating in stealth mode.

To learn more about the company, visit www.guru.com.