Tag: urbanize

Final houses take shape at Gardena’s One Seven Eight development

Final houses take shape at Gardena's One Seven Eight development Steven Sharp Sun, 09/19/2021 - 07:00

Seven months after we last dropped by, construction is in the home stretch at One Seven Eight, a new townhome development from Melia Homes in Gardena.

Rendering of One Seven EightMelia Homes

The project, located on a five-acre site on 178th Street between Normandie and Western Avenues, replaced a light industrial building with a series of three-story residential structures containing a total of 114 townhomes. 

According a sales website for the property, One Seven Eight includes a mix of two-, three-, and four-bedroom floor plans, ranging from 1,528 to 1,795 square feet in size.  The townhomes will be arranged around a network of private streets, green spaces, and amenities accessible to residents and guests.

Sales prices for the remaining houses start in the $700,000s, according to the sales website.

1515 178th StreetGoogle Maps

Melia Homes, which is based in Irvine, recently broke ground on a second Gardena development a few miles north on Vermont Avenue.  That project, called Evergreen Row, replaces a nursery with 80 for-sale units.

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Construction at One Seven EightUrbanize LA

Rendering of One Seven EightMelia Homes

Rendering of One Seven EightMelia Homes

1515 178th StreetGoogle Maps

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114 townhomes just south of Artesia Boulevard
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Construction at One Seven Eight
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Metrolink suspends service in Orange County for track repairs, Inglewood could raise taxes for people mover, and more

Metrolink suspends service in Orange County for track repairs, Inglewood could raise taxes for people mover, and more Steven Sharp Sat, 09/18/2021 - 07:00

Earlier this week, Metrolink suspended rail service to San Juan Capistrano, San Clemente and Oceanside to account for emergency repairs to crumbling right-of-way atop seaside bluffs in San Clemente.  Orange County and Inland Empire-Orange County line trains will be impacted through Monday, October 4.  If repairs are completed earlier than that date, service may resume earlier.

Construction begins on sea wall to protect train tracks in Del Mar "The sea wall is the final stage of $11 million in emergency repairs needed to safeguard the tracks after a wide portion of the bluff collapsed in late February. The slide came within 35 feet of the railroad ties on the only train route between San Diego and Los Angeles and the rest of the West Coast." (LA Times)

Rendering of the proposed Inglewood People Mover's Downtown Inglewood StationMetro

Inglewood is raising taxes to pay for the Transit Connector (people mover) project "The Inglewood City Council is attempting to pull a fast one on Inglewood residents.  The city declared a bogus 'fiscal emergency' to force an accelerated special election in November 2, 2021.  The purpose of the election is to increase taxes, which will then be leveraged to fund the building of the Inglewood Transit Connector (people mover)." (2UrbanGirls)

Metro Bike Share has new look with DoorDash ad campaign "The look is different but otherwise Metro Bike Share functions the same way. Revenues from the ad campaign help Metro offset costs of the bike share program. The DoorDash ad campaign is for one year." (The Source)

High-speed train to Las Vegas is hailed as an eco jackpot. But will it harm desert sheep? "The proposed rail project, which would occupy the center divider of Interstate 15, calls for the construction of a 6-foot-high concrete barrier to keep vehicles from careening into trains as they hurtle through the desert at speeds close to 200 mph. The barrier, however, would also prevent animals from making an already perilous crossing of the freeway." (LA Times)

Proposed route for the Brightline West systemBrightline West

City Getting Closer to Reclaiming 710 Stub "Once the city gets the land back, a multidisciplinary community-driven visioning process will begin to lay out the future land use, transportation and utility infrastructure networks needed to reconnect Pasadena. That effort will include significant public outreach and input to rework the stub back into the fabric of the city. This multi-year effort is expected to begin sometime next year." (Pasadena Now)

Eyes on the Street: New Two-Way Protected Lanes on Elenda in Culver City "The new Elenda bikeway extends one-third of a mile from Washington to Culver Boulevard. Where Elenda ends in front of the school, the two-way bikeway turns north to run along Washington for about 125 feet to the intersection of Washington and Girard Avenue." (Streetsblog LA)

LA County Adopts New Indoor Vaccine Rules to Prevent 'Widespread Suffering' "Under the rules every single employee and patron at bars, clubs and wineries will need to have at least one shot by Oct. 7 and two shots (if applicable) by Nov. 4....Mega events, classified as indoor events with more than 1,000 people and outdoor events with more than 10,000 people, will also have to comply, meaning most stadiums, concert venues and theme parks will be impacted." (dot LA)

How to bring back steelhead trout to the L.A. River "The possibilities are still being discussed, Dell'Apa said. One plan — outlined recently in National Geographic — might be to deepen the central channel by two feet, and line it with soft, natural material such as sand, sediment, gravel, cobbles, and aquatic plants. Another idea, according to Atkins, is to slow down the current with rocks in the river or an S-shaped flow instead of something linear." (The Eastsider)

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A Metrolink train in San ClementeWikimedia Commons

Rendering of the proposed Inglewood People Mover's Downtown Inglewood StationMetro

Proposed route for the Brightline West systemBrightline West

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Real estate, architecture, and urban planning news
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A Metrolink train in San Clemente
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Six-story, 66-unit development fully framed in East Hollywood

Six-story, 66-unit development fully framed in East Hollywood Steven Sharp Fri, 09/17/2021 - 13:00

In East Hollywood, the wood-and-concrete frame of a new multifamily residential development from Safco Capital is topped out on Melrose Avenue.

Construction at 4658 Melrose AvenueUrbanize LA

The project, located at the southwest corner of Melrose and Ardmore Avenue, consists of a six-story building that will feature 66 studio, one-, and two-bedroom apartments above a semi-subterranean parking garage for 66 vehicles at completion.

Project entitlements include Transit Oriented Communities development incentives, permitting reduced building setbacks and on-site open space relative to the amounts required by local zoning rules.  Safco will set aside six of the apartments as affordable housing in exchange for the incentives.

Designed by The Albert Group Architects, the apartment complex at 4658 Melrose Avenue is composed of five levels of wood-frame construction stacked above a concrete podium.  Architectural plans show that the stucco-clad structure will include a rooftop amenity deck.

Completion is anticipated in mid-2022, according to a project website.

4658 Melrose AvenueGoogle Maps

The project is the latest in a recent series of housing developments built on Melrose Avenue, including an under construction co-living project from Six Peak Capital.

Safco, the developer of 4658 Melrose, is planning three similar mixed-use and multifamily residential projects in Westlake.

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Rendering of 4658 Melrose AvenueThe Albert Group Architects

Construction at 4658 Melrose AvenueUrbanize LA

4658 Melrose AvenueGoogle Maps

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New apartments on pace to debut in mid-2022
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After overcoming recall, Newsom signs suite of housing bills

After overcoming recall, Newsom signs suite of housing bills Steven Sharp Fri, 09/17/2021 - 11:00

Fresh off of a lopsided victory over a recall campaign, California Governor Gavin Newsom has signed a suite of bills intended to boost housing production statewide.

“The housing affordability crisis is undermining the California Dream for families across the state, and threatens our long-term growth and prosperity,” said Newsom in a news release. “Making a meaningful impact on this crisis will take bold investments, strong collaboration across sectors and political courage from our leaders and communities to do the right thing and build housing for all."

The bills signed by Newsom include SB 9, sponsored by State Senate President pro Tempore Toni G. Atkins, which enables the construction of duplexes statewide - effectively eliminating single-family zoning in California.  However, the legislation restricts the subdivision of any properties subject to affordability covenants, and requires that at least one unit be owner occupied.

“SB 9 will open up opportunities for homeowners to help ease our state’s housing shortage, while still protecting tenants from displacement," said Atkins in a prepared statement.  "And it will help our communities welcome new families to the neighborhood and enable more folks to set foot on the path to buying their first home.”

Newsom also signed SB 10, legislation from San Francisco Senator Scott Wiener which permits cities and counties to voluntarily create a process for streamlining the approval of new developments with up to 10 residential units on infill sites near transit.

“California’s severe housing shortage is badly damaging our state, and we need many approaches to tackle it,” said Wiener. “SB 10 provides one important approach: making it dramatically easier and faster for cities to zone for more housing. It shouldn’t take five or 10 years for cities to re-zone, and SB 10 gives cities a powerful new tool to get the job done quickly. I want to thank the Governor for signing this essential bill and for continuing to lead on housing.”

The Los Angeles City Council voted in August to oppose both SB 9 and SB 10, arguing that the bills would pare back local control over zoning and accelerate gentrification.

The new housing legislation was accompanied by the announcement of a $1.75 billion plan by the state Housing and Community Development Department to fund shovel-ready affordable housing projects that have thus far been unable to secure financing through tax-exempt bonds or low-income housing tax credits.  The new funding will go toward 90 projects, generating between 6,300 and 7,200 units of new affordable low-income housing statewide.  That total would include roughly 1,200 units of permanent supportive housing.

“This investment is going to unlock the keys to upwards of 7,200 quality affordable homes for Californians who need it most," =Housing and Community Development director Gustavo Velasquez.  "Homes that ensure so many can focus on better opportunities for their wellbeing, education, and employment. These swift and bold solutions are how we ensure our families and communities come back better than ever before.”

For more information on the program, visit the California Housing Accelerator website

The accelerator funding is part of a broader initiative called the California Comeback Plan, which will funnel $22 billion into housing and homelessness programs in the wake of the pandemic.  The spending is expected to lead to the creation of 84,000 new affordable homes, more than half of which would be reserved for people exiting homelessness.

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The Downtown skyline viewed from MacArthur ParkHunter Kerhart Architectural Photography

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Including SB 9, which permits duplexes statewide
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Senior housing complex to replace church parking lot in Pasadena

Senior housing complex to replace church parking lot in Pasadena Steven Sharp Fri, 09/17/2021 - 10:00

The parking lot of First Church of Christ, Scientist in Pasadena could be redeveloped with senior housing, per an agenda item from the September 14 meeting of the city's Design Commission.

Aerial view looking southeast from Oakland AvenueGGA

Belmont Village, a developer which specializes in senior housing projects, is seeking approvals to build a five-story edifice on the north side of El Dorado Street between Oakland and Madison Avenues.  The 117,000-square-foot building would feature 131 studio, one-, and two-bedroom dwellings, in addition to amenities such as a pool, a screening room, and dining areas.  Additionally, plans call for a two-level, 195-car subterranean parking garage which would serve employees of the senior housing facility, as well as the adjacent church.

Pasadena-based GGA is designing the project, which would consist of a contemporary podium-type building.

"The regimented fenestration visually ties into to the composition of the columns of the neoclassical design of the adjacent church," reads a staff report.  "The design also includes open balconies and rooftop terraces with arbors and canopies, with the majority of the rooftop balconies and open terraces facing north or toward the courtyard.  The building design takes into account the sensitive adjacent historic resource and responds by utilizing graduated massing that transitions in height from two stories at the northwest corner of the site, closest to the church, to five stories at the center of the site and then back down to four stories facing South Madison Avenue."

Aerial view looking northwest from Madison Avenue and El Dorado StreetGGA

The Design Commission hearing was for a preliminary review of the proposed development, and a vote was not scheduled.  Construction of the facility is contingent on the approval of zoning entitlements and the design concept, as well as the issuance of building permits.

Belmont Village, based out of Houston, Texas, is also behind plans for a second senior housing complex that would replace another church parking lot in Westwood.

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Aerial view looking southeast from Oakland AvenueGGA

View looking southeast from Oakland AvenueGGA

Aerial view looking east from Oakland AvenueGGA

Street-level view looking east from Oakland AvenueGGA

Rendering of Belmont Village development in Pasadena, looking northeast from Oakland Avenue and El Dorado StreetGGA

Street-level view looking northeast from El Dorado and OaklandGGA

Aerial view looking northGGA

View looking northwest from El Dorado StreetGGA

View looking northeast from Madison Avenue and El Dorado StreetGGA

Aerial view looking northwest from Madison Avenue and El Dorado StreetGGA

View looking northwest from Madison Avenue and El Dorado StreetGGA

Street-level view looking south on Madison AvenueGGA

Aerial view from Madison Avenue looking southwestGGA

View from Madison Avenue looking southwestGGA

Proposed site of Belmont Village project in PasadenaGoogle Maps

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Belmont Village plans a five-story building next to the First Church of Christ, Scientist
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Rendering of Belmont Village development in Pasadena, looking northeast from Oakland Avenue and El Dorado Street
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MAD Architects is designing a domed office tower on Sunset Boulevard

MAD Architects is designing a domed office tower on Sunset Boulevard Steven Sharp Fri, 09/17/2021 - 07:00

MAD Architects, the firm behind the $1-billion Lucas Museum of Narrative Art and the Gardenhouse condominiums in Beverly Hills, is bringing another outlandish design to Los Angeles.

Street-level view of The Star looking north toward the Hollywood hillsMAD Architects

Yesterday, plans were filed by the City of Los Angeles to redevelop a property near the intersection of Sunset Boulevard and Gower Street with a domed high-rise called "The Star."  Plans call for razing multiple small commercial structures, clearing the way for the construction of a new 22-story, 500,000-square-foot office building.

The $500-million development, which would front both Sunset Boulevard and Harold Way, takes cues from a number of Hollywood landmarks, according to its architect.

“The Star is both a testament and addition to the city’s iconic architecture," said MAD Architects founder Ma Yansong in a prepared statement.  "Inspired by the curvilinear forms of the Griffith Observatory, Capitol Records Building, Hollywood Bowl, and the Cinerama Dome, it asserts a new typology for the office of the future."

View from outdoor terrace at The StarMAD Architects

The building's curved profile is landscaped from head to toe, including multiple sky gardens embedded into the side of the tower, as well as terraced green spaces near street level.  The Star culminates in a domed rooftop deck, described as a "terrarium-like" space, which offer space for a restaurant - and views of the Los Angeles basin.  Eschewing a typical elevator, visitors would access the rooftop through a funicular cable rail.

Billed as the largest new office building in Hollywood, the project is another big bet on the Hollywood office market, which has experienced a resurgence in recent years as companies such as ViacomCBS and Netflix have leased large spaces nearby.

“Since Hollywood is the birthplace of the entertainment industry, The Star’s prime location on Sunset Boulevard and its unique design present an unparalleled opportunity for a major company to make a bold statement and proudly plant their flag in the rightful home of entertainment in LA,” said Edgar Khalatian, who represents project applicant, The Star, LLC.

Proposed location of The StarGoogle Maps

The Los Angeles Times reports that the limited liability company is a family partnership led by investor Maggie Gong Miracle.  A timeline for The Star has not been announced.

More information about the project is available at its official website.

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Aerial view of The Star looking southeast from above HollywoodMAD Architects

Street-level view of The Star looking north toward the Hollywood hillsMAD Architects

View from outdoor terrace at The StarMAD Architects

Proposed location of The StarGoogle Maps

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The project would include a funicular cable rail and a rooftop restaurant
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Aerial view of The Star looking southeast from above Hollywood
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Bridge housing facility contines construction in West Athens

Bridge housing facility contines construction in West Athens Steven Sharp Thu, 09/16/2021 - 14:00

Two years after a formal groundbreaking ceremony, a new shelter and bridge housing facility is starting to take shape on a County-owned site next-door to the West Athens Sheriff’s station and Probation office.

Interior view of Safe Landing West AthensKFA Architecture

Safe Landing West Athens, located on a roughly 3.1-acre site near the intersection of Normandie Avenue and Imperial Highway, is will operate 24 hours per day and provide shelter to up to 176 people at a time.  The 90,000-square-foot facility is expected to include:

  • an intake clinic; 
  • an administration building; 
  • a kitchen and dining facility; 
  • a men's dormitory; 
  • a women's dormitory; and 
  • a couple's dormitory.

Designed by KFA Architecture is designing Safe Landing, which consists of a series of single-story metal buildings that will be arranged around a landscaped central courtyard.

View of Safe Landing West Athens from Normandie Avenue looking eastKFA Architecture

In addition to housing, the campus will offer health, mental health, and substance abuse treatments to future residents.  At the time of its groundbreaking in 2019, there were more than 700 unhoused persons living within two miles of the Safe Landing site.

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Aerial view of Safe Landing looking northeastKFA Architecture

View of Safe Landing from across Normandie AvenueKFA Architecture

View of Safe Landing West Athens from Normandie Avenue looking eastKFA Architecture

Interior view of Safe Landing West AthensKFA Architecture

Interior view of Safe Landing West AthensKFA Architecture

Construction of Safe Landing West Athens, view looking southeast from Normandie AvenueUrbanize LA

Location of Safe Landing-West AthensGoogle Maps

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The 90,000-square-foot facility sits near the intersection of Normandie and Imperial Highway
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L.A. City Council approves $10.7m for supportive housing in Harvard Heights

L.A. City Council approves $10.7m for supportive housing in Harvard Heights Steven Sharp Thu, 09/16/2021 - 13:00

At its meeting yesterday, the Los Angeles City Council voted to approve the release of $10.7 million in funding for a new permanent supportive housing development near the border between Koreatown and Harvard Heights.

1043-1049 S Harvard BoulevardGoogle Street View

The proposed project, called McDaniel House, is a joint venture between Decro Corp. and Daylight Community Development.  Plans call for razing a pair of single-family homes located at 1043-1049 S. Harvard Boulevard, clearing the way for the construction of a four-story building 47 apartments - including 46 affordable units and one manager's unit.

According to a Housing Department staff report to the Council, a mix of studio, one-, and two-bedroom units, all of which will be priced for households earning no more than 50 percent of the area median income.  Half of the apartments will be reserved for chronically homeless households.

Studio One Eleven is designing McDaniel House, which will be composed of steel modular units wrapped in fiber cement siding.  In addition to housing, the apartment complex will incorporate a small parking lot, social services offices, a central courtyard, a laundry facility, and other amenities.

1043-1049 S Harvard BoulevardGoogle Maps

The $10.7-million bond financing will contribute to a total project cost of $22 million, which also includes traditional financing and an allocation from Measure HHH.  The per-unit cost of the project is estimated at just under $469,000.

Decro and Daylight have teamed to develop multiple supportive housing at multiple sites in Los Angeles, including under-construction developments in Watts and North Hollywood.

Looking for affordable housing? Visit lahousing.lacity.org/aahr and housing.lacounty.gov

California's 2021 state income limits

Click here for additional affordable housing resources

 

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Rendering of McDaniel House at 1043 S Harvard BoulevardStudio One Eleven

1043-1049 S Harvard BoulevardGoogle Street View

1043-1049 S Harvard BoulevardGoogle Maps

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The project would replace two houses just south of Olympic Boulevard
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Rendering of McDaniel House at 1043 S Harvard Boulevard
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Publicly-owned sites in Cudahy primed for redevelopment

Publicly-owned sites in Cudahy primed for redevelopment Steven Sharp Thu, 09/16/2021 - 10:45

A collection of vacant county- and city-owned buildings in Cudahy could make way for multifamily housing and community-serving uses, under an arrangement approved yesterday by the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors.

Earlier in September, the City of Cudahy signed off on the demolition of a collection of city-owned properties at 4718-4722 and 4734 Santa Ana Street and 4613 Santa Clara Street, citing unsafe conditions.  The properties sit directly east of another publicly-owned site - a vacant building at 8130 South Atlantic Avenue that was previously occupied by the County's Department of Public Social Services (DPSS).

8130 Atlantic Avenue - site of the vacant DPSS BuildingGoogle Maps

The County, which has determined that rehabilitating the DPSS facility to be cost prohibitive, is now seeking to package the property with the soon-to-be vacant city lots to create a contiguous site suitable for the construction of affordable housing, as well as other economic development opportunities and community-serving uses.

A staff briefing to the Board of Supervisors, citing a report by the SELA Collaborative, notes that 46 percent of Cudahy households are renters, with approximately 47 percent of households containing three or more adults.  The report states that disinvestment in Southeast Los Angeles County and discriminatory practices such has redlinining have contributed to this phenomenon.

The vote by the Board of Supervisors authorizes predevelopment activities for the site, including an environmental assessment and design work, which would be funded by $4 million reallocated from the Music Center annex building project.

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8130 Atlantic Avenue - site of the vacant DPSS BuildingGoogle Street View

8130 Atlantic Avenue - site of the vacant DPSS BuildingGoogle Maps

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Properties owned by L.A. County and the City of Cudahy
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8130 Atlantic Avenue - site of the vacant DPSS Building
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Eight-story, 188-unit development on the rise in Palms

Eight-story, 188-unit development on the rise in Palms Steven Sharp Thu, 09/16/2021 - 10:00

Six months after breaking ground in Palms, developer a mixed-use apartment complex from developer Oakmont Capital is starting to take shape just north of the intersection of Overland Avenue and Venice Boulevard. 

View from across Overland AvenueArchean Light

The project, located on a T-shaped property with frontage at 3664-3688 Overland and 3667-3673 Keystone Avenue, consists of two podium-type apartment buildings that will feature 188 one- and two-bedroom apartments and 3,000 square feet of street-fronting commercial space at completion.  Plans also call for parking for 106 vehicles.

Oakmont's entitlements for the project include Transit Oriented Communities incentives, allowing for a larger structure than otherwise permitted by zoning regulations due to the property's location near frequent bus service.  In exchange for the bonus floor area, a total of 19 of the planned apartments will be set aside as deed-restricted affordable housing.

View of project site from Overland AvenueUrbanize LA

Designed by Reed Architectural Group, the project includes an eight-story building facing Overland and a smaller five-story edifice fronting keystone.  Architectural plans show sleek mid-rise structures with shared amenities such as a fitness center, a rooftop deck, and a swimming pool.

In addition to the under-construction project, Oakmont also plans to build housing on two neighboring sites across the street at 3547-3555 and 3565-3585 Overland. The company has also secured approvals to build a 50-unit apartment complex at the intersection of National Boulevard and Canfield Avenue.

View from Keystone AvenueArchean Light

The Overland Avenue site also neighbors The Roy, a smaller mixed-use apartment building which opened in 2018, and The Jagger, a another apartment complex with ground-floor retail space which is now under construction.

View of project site from Keystone AvenueUrbanize LA

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View from Overland Avenue looking northeastArchean Light

View from across Overland AvenueArchean Light

View of project site from Overland AvenueUrbanize LA

View from Keystone AvenueArchean Light

View of project site from Keystone AvenueUrbanize LA

3667-3673 Keystone Avenue and 3664-3688 Overland AvenueGoogle Maps

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Mixed-use building takes form on Overland Avenue
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