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‘There’s Hope For Others’: Cancer Survivor Overcomes COVID-19, Plans To Donate Plasma To Help Others Fight Virus

More and more people who have contracted COVID-19 over the last few weeks have begun sharing their stories, urging others to take the pandemic seriously.

LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) — More and more people who have contracted COVID-19 over the last few weeks have begun sharing their stories, urging others to take the pandemic seriously.

“I can honestly say that I was very scared to the point of kind of going crazy, thinking that I would never see my wife again,” said COVID-19 survivor Steve Schlosberg.

Fortunately, 67-year-old Steve Schlosberg did see his wife again and was back home with her Tuesday after fighting and defeating COVID-19.

The semi-retired financial services representative said it started one month ago when he felt the intense headaches, body aches, fever, and fatigue.

He had suspected he had contracted coronavirus and decided to quarantine at home hoping it would pass — it didn’t.

“After one week at home, the following Wednesday is when I was just done and my body was just shutting down,” Schlosberg said.

His wife Leslie took him to St. John’s Regional Medical Center in Oxnard where he was diagnosed with COVID-19 and pneumonia.

“All of a sudden, things turned for the worse, I couldn’t get enough oxygen and so they kept on having to increase the amount of oxygen they were giving me,” Schlosberg said.

While in the ICU, Schlosberg said he was given five different drugs, including “hydroxychloroquine,” a drug used to treat malaria.

Then, his wife and doctors decided to try something else before placing him on a ventilator.

“They had discussed something they heard out of New York, mentioning if they turned me over and got me on my abdomen, that it might relieve some of the gases and miraculously my need for oxygen dropped steadily over the next six hours.”

After 10 days in the hospital, Steve was sent home where he still needed oxygen to help him breathe. He no longer needs the machine and said each breath he takes these days is filled with gratitude.

“I can’t say from my experience which really made me become cured, I just know I’m the luckiest man, I’m just very very fortunate,” he said.

Schlosberg, who survived cancer and now COVID-19, shared a message along with his wife Leslie.

“I hope it doesn’t happen to anybody, but if it does, truthfully, there were a couple of days there that were pretty bleak, not to give up because something could work,” said Leslie.

“Knowing that I can tell my story, anytime I can tell my story, that means there’s hope for others,” Schlosberg said.

Once he has fully recovered, Schlosberg plans on donating his plasma to help others fight off the virus.

Plasma from once-infected patients like Schlosberg now contain antibodies that helped their immune system fight the virus when they were sick.